Next Door / Speakers / Chris Adamson

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    Chris Adamson


    Chris Adamson is the co-author of iPhone 10 SDK Development (Pragmatic Programmers) and Learning Core Audio (Addison-Wesley Professional). He's also an independent iOS and Mac developer, based in Grand Rapids, Michigan, where he also writes the Time.code() blog at subfurther.com/blog and hosts livestreams at invalidstream.com . Over the years, he has managed to own fourteen and a half Macs.

     

    CocoaConf Next Door Presentations

    Fall Premieres: Media Frameworks in iOS 11, macOS 10.13, and tvOS 11

    What’s Apple planning for its media frameworks in the next 12 months? What’s it doing with Apple TV, or the HTTP Live Streaming standard? We won’t know until the curtain drops on WWDC! In this talk, we’ll amass everything audio- and video-related that gets announced throughout the week, combine it with the solid base of frameworks already present in the Apple platforms, and figure out from there what we’re going to be playing with in 2018.


    Firebase: Totally Not Parse All Over Again (Unless It Is)

    With Facebook shutting down Parse, everybody knows to never again depend on a third party for their backend solution, right? Sure, and after you spend six months trying to write your own syncing service, how's that working? In 2016, Google has added a ton of features to Firebase, their popular backend-as-a-service solution. Firebase's primary offering is a realtime database in the cloud that syncs changes to and from multiple concurrent users, and their Swift-friendly iOS SDK makes it ideal for mobile use. In this session, you'll learn how to set up a Firebase backend and build an iOS app around it.


    Media Frameworks and Swift: This Is Fine

    Swift is great for writing iOS and Mac apps, and its creators also mean for it to be used as a systems programming language. However, certain traits about Swift make it officially off-limits for use in some audio/video-processing scenarios. What's the deal, is it not fast enough or what? We'll look at what media apps can and can't do in Swift, and what you're supposed to do instead. We'll also look at strategies for knowing what responsibilities to dole out to Swift and to C, and how to make those parts of your code play nicely with each other.