Next Door / Speakers / Mike Ash

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    Mike Ash


    Mike Ash has been programming for Apple platforms for over two decades and for Mac OS X since the Public Beta. He is the author of the bi-weekly Friday Q&A blog series on deep technical topics related to Mac and iOS programming, as well as the compilation book The Complete Friday Q&A: Volume I. In between abusing the Objective-C runtime, he flies his glider over the beautiful Shenandoah Valley. When not flying, he holds down a day job at Plausible Labs. Mike's blog can be found at http://mikeash.com/pyblog.

     

    CocoaConf Next Door Presentations

    A Tour of the Objective-C Runtime API

    The Objective-C runtime is at the heart of the language, and is still heavily involved in Swift. We'll take a look at exactly what the Objective-C runtime is, how it works, how it ties into Swift, and what you can do with it. We'll finish up with an instruction-by-instruction walkthrough of the objc_msgSend function that drives every square bracket expression you write.


    Exploring Swift Memory Layout

    Let's get down to bits and bytes! Abstraction is great, but sometimes it's useful to dig down. In this session, we'll explore exactly how Swift lays out data in memory, including both your own variables and Swift's internal data structures. We'll build a program to recursively scan memory at runtime to dump out everything we want to know, then walk through its results and what they mean, and compare and contrast with how C and C++ store their data.


    Unicode and Swift Strings

    Text and string processing is a subject that looks easy at first, but becomes tremendously complicated the more you look into it. Unicode is the modern standard for computer text processing, and it's full of complexity. In this talk, we'll take a deep look at Unicode's history, design, and structure. You'll learn about code points, code units, combining characters, normalization, emoji, UTF-8, UTF-16, and UTF-32. With this foundation in place, we'll bring it all back to practical applications by seeing how it fits in with Swift's powerful but sometimes complicated String API.